Monday, September 4, 2017

Mystery of the 'Mandela Effect' - Are 'False Memories' Proof of Parallel Universes?



A controversial and intriguing theory suggests that 'false memories' could be proof of parallel universes.

Scientists are naturally divided on this topic and most think false memories are a result of how we misremember things. Yet, perhaps there is more to it than we are aware of. It has been suggested that people are sliding between multiple universes and that's how we can create very odd memories of something we have never seen or heard in this world.

We have previously discussed the possibility that some of our dreams may be glimpses of events taking place in an alternate reality, a parallel Universe.

Another intriguing theory is that parallel universes could explain the déjà vu phenomenon. It's the feeling, or impression that you have already witnessed or experienced a current situation.

For a long time, this eerie sensation has been attributed to everything from paranormal disturbances to neurological disorders, but it has also been suggested that there is a hidden connection between déjà vu and the existence of parallel universes.

The theory that 'false memories' can be traced to the existence of parallel universes is rather new, but we will undoubtedly hear much more about it in the near future.



Another intriguing possibility is that there is a hidden connection between déjà vu and the existence of parallel universes.

The Mandela Effect And It's Connection To Parallel Universes

The term 'Mandela Effect' was coined by blogger Fiona Broome when she discovered that she, along with many others, shared the same, distinct memory of former South African President Nelson Mandela dying in a South African prison in the 1980s.

Mandela died in 2013, in the comfort of his home, having served as South Africa's President for some time after the 80s.

Basically, the Mandela Effect refers to a phenomenon in which a large number of people share false memories of past events, referred to as confabulation in psychiatry.

Some have speculated that the memories are caused by parallel universes spilling into our own, while others explain the phenomenon as a failure of collective memory.

Gene A. Brewer, Ph.D, an Associate Professor at Arizona state University's Department of Psychology have studied memory through experiments and neuro-imaging and he doesn't think there is a connection between false memories and parallel universe.

"All of us fall victim to false memory. We all misremember things, and we do it in a stereotypical way," said Brewer.

"Our systems work very similarly to one another. So I may have a false memory, you may have a false memory, and those could be very similar to one another," Professor Brewer said.

Why Do We Misremember So Many Things?

According to Professor Brewer said it is due to recombination, or a daily process in which a person's brain takes fragments from the past, and tries to reassemble them in a way that makes sense.

"As you're trying to remember what the Monopoly Man may have looked like, you may inadvertently remember some bits and pieces about the planters peanut man," said Professor Brewer.



Professor Brewer explained that a human brain remembers the "top ha" * on both mascots, and subconsciously placed Mr. Peanut's eyeglass onto Monopoly Man's face.

Professor Brewer said the Mandela Effect can also be explained by a process called collective remembering.

"We communicate false memories through the groups that were associated to," said Brewer.

"That leads to a cultural false memory, where many people hold the same false belief that things happened that didn't really happen."

Dave Campbell, a medium and hypnotherapist has an entirely different opinion.

"Some people say past lives, some people say our souls split in many pieces, and we can experience many lives at the same time.

Sometimes, we have similar inventions in different universes at the same time, like microwave. In one universe, we might call it a microwave, and in another universe, we call it a quick cooker," Campbell said.

It will take some strong arguments and evidence to convince cognitive scientists that false memories are the result of peoples' visits to parallel worlds, especially since physicists still haven't found conclusive proof that parallel worlds do exist.

But all controversial theories are intriguing and should be investigated.

It cannot be denied that there is still so much we do not know about the nature of space and time, not to mention our role in the Universe...

Multiverse

Dimensions and Hyperdimensions